Planning Without Planner: Developing Students’ Checklist Academic Planner (SCAP) for University Students

Authors

  • 'Ainatul Fathiyah Abdul Rahim Faculty of Administrative Science and Policy Studies, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Cawangan Pahang, Raub Campus
  • Nurul Afzan Najid Faculty of Accountancy, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Cawangan Pahang, Raub Campus
  • Rafizah Mohd Noor Faculty of Administrative Science and Policy Studies, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Cawangan Pahang, Raub Campus
  • Nur Ain Yaacob Faculty of Administrative Science and Policy Studies, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Cawangan Pahang, Raub Campus
  • Nursyahida Zulkifli Faculty of Administrative Science and Policy Studies, Universiti Teknologi MARA,Cawangan Kelantan

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.24191/ji.v14i2.213

Keywords:

self-management tool, enhancement, learning experience

Abstract

A university environment's freedom and flexibility can derail students who have not mastered time-management skills. During high school, they had a rigidly structured schedule but unfortunately, students often struggle to balance their academic, personal and work commitments when they are in the university.In university, the students will be challenged with many competing demands on their time. Consequently,many students simply choose to give up and let the situation takes its course. Without intervention from alecturer or parents, the student is unlikely to succeed and will end up with low academic results. Eventhough there are many apps that have been developed to assist them in managing time, the students needto ‘see time’ or in other words make time visual. Therefore, the SCAP is a worthwhile guideline that isspecially invented in promoting their time effectively and efficiently. Keywords: self-management tool, enhancement, learning experience

References

Andrea, H. & Valtcheva, A. (2009). Promoting learning and achievement through self-assessment. Theory into Practice, 48, 12-19.
Campbell, R. L., & Svenson, L.W. (1992). Perceived level of stress among university undergraduate students in Edmonton, Canada. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 75(2), 552-554.
Entwistle, N., & Ramsden, P. (1983). Understanding student learning. London: Croom Helm.
Faisal, Z., Miqdadi, A. F., Mohammad, T., & Nabil, M. (2014). The relationship between time management and the academic performance of students. Bridgeport, CT: University of Bridgeport.
Goodrich, H. (1996). Student self-assessment: At the intersection of metacognition and authentic assessment. Retrieved from https://scholar.google.com.my/scholar?
Karim, S., & Mitra, K. (2015). Time management skills impact on self-efficacy and academic performance. Journal of American Science, 7(12).
Kirschenbaum, D. S., & Perri, M. G. (1982). Improving academic competence in adults: A review of recent research. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 29(1), 76-94.
Lay, C. H., & Schouwenburg, H. C. (1993). Trait procrastination, time management, and academic behavior. Journal of Social Behavior & Personality, 84(4), 647-662.
Macan, T. H., Shahani, C., Dipboye, R. L., & Phillips, A. P. (1990). College student' time management: Correlations with academic performance and stress. Journal of Educational Psychology, 82(4), 760-768.
Pintrich, P. (2000). The role of goal orientation in selfregulated learning. In M. Boekaerts, P. Pintrich, & M. Zeidner (Eds.), Handbook of self-regulation (pp. 452–502). San Diego, CA: Academic Press.
Sane, J. C. & Llorente, G. I. (2014). Peer assessment and self-assessment: Effective learning tools in higher education. International Journal of Engineering Education.
Schunk, D. (2003). Self-efficacy for reading and writing: Influence of modeling, goal-setting, and self evaluation. Reading & Writing Quarterly, 19, 159– 172.
Winsor, D. (2017). Using students’ self-assessment to increase student learning outcome. Retrieved from https://repository.uwyo.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=1065&context=smtc_plan_b on 16/10/2019

Downloads

Published

2019-11-29